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Reviews in Project: Miscellaneous Reviews (258)

Heartaches by the Number

Finna

By Nino Cipri

26 Sep, 2019

Miscellaneous Reviews

2 comments

Nino Cipri’s 2020 Finna is a standalone SF novella. 

Heartbroken over her breakup with Jules, Ava has rearranged her life to minimize contact with her ex. A challenging task, given that the pair both work at soulless big box store LitenVärld. Still, careful schedule management should do the trick. At least if fucking Derek doesn’t call in sick, obligating Ava come in to work on what should be an off-day. 

The resulting encounter between the former couple is as uncomfortable as it is unwanted. But it could be worse — and is. 


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I’m a Lionheart

The Ten Thousand Doors of January

By Alix E. Harrow

18 Sep, 2019

Miscellaneous Reviews

2 comments

Alix E. Harrow’s debut novel The Ten Thousand Doors of January is a standalone portal fantasy. 

January Scaller rarely sees her beloved father, because Julian Scaller is absent running errands for wealthy Mr. Locke. She has been raised mainly by Mr. Locke’s servants. Her life is cozy and safe, but January increasingly feels that she is just one of Locke’s carefully guarded treasures. Not at all a person.

But a person who is a one-of-a-kind human, one who might not do well in the harsh outside world. 


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Just Something In My Stars

A Dead Djinn in Cairo

By Djeli P. Clark

11 Sep, 2019

Miscellaneous Reviews

1 comment

P. Djèlí Clark’s A Dead Djinn in Cairo is an alternate-history fantasy novella. It shares its setting with The Haunting of Tram Car 015.

Forty years ago, al-Jahiz opened the world to magic. Bad news for the Ottomans, the British, and the French, whose domination of Egypt came to an abrupt halt. Good news for Egypt, independent once more. But magic and magical beings bring problems of their own. Fatma el-Sha’arawi, special investigator with the Egyptian Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments, and Supernatural Entities, spends her days dealing with them. 

For example, the matter of the dead and bloodless djinn. 


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Through the Dark, Through the Door

Sultana’s Dream

By Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain

27 Aug, 2019

Miscellaneous Reviews

4 comments

Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain’s 1905 Sultana’s Dream is a feminist utopian novella. It was originally published in The Indian Ladies Journal.

A sultana muses on the condition of women in Calcutta, the city in which she lives. When a woman she takes for an old friend invites her for a walk, the sultana goes with her. It soon becomes clear the sultana has misunderstood the situation. 


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Straight On To Morning

To Be Taught, if Fortunate

By Becky Chambers

15 Aug, 2019

Miscellaneous Reviews

2 comments


To Be Taught, if Fortunate is a standalone hard-SF novella from Becky Chambers. 

Flight engineer Ariadne O’Neill and mission specialists Elena Quesada-Cruz, 

Jack Vo, and Chikondi Daka have been dispatched aboard the OCA spacecraft Merian to the red dwarf star Zhenyi (BA-921), just which is a mere fourteen light-years from Sol. 

Faster than light drives do not exist and neither does terraforming. Instead, the explorers must depend on somaforming, a technologically induced metamorphosis that will adapt them to the worlds they visit. 

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Another Day in Paradise

Deep Roots  (Innsmouth Legacy, book 2)

By Ruthanna Emrys

31 Jul, 2019

Miscellaneous Reviews

2 comments

2018’s Deep Roots is the second volume in Ruthanna Emrys’ Innsmouth Legacy series. 

Aphra Marsh survived an American concentration camp. She is one of very few land-dwelling Deep Ones still alive. Despite their much reduced numbers, she hopes to rebuild her shattered community. To do this, she needs the US government’s cooperation — or at least an end to active attempts to exterminate the Deep Ones. 

But nuclear war threatens. Were it to happen, it would render her efforts pointless. Toleration of land-dwelling Deep Ones would mean nothing if the humans were to make the land temporarily uninhabitable. The ocean-dwelling Deep Ones would live on, but once their land-kin vanished, there would be no way to re-establish them. 

The Deep Ones are not the only beings worried about humanity’s future. 


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Hunting Tonight

The Hound of Justice  (Janet Watson, book 2)

By Claire O’Dell

18 Jul, 2019

Miscellaneous Reviews

0 comments


2019’s The Hound of Justice is the second volume in Claire O’Dell’s Janet Watson Chronicles. 

Doctor Janet Watson has a new prosthetic arm and a new position at Georgetown University Hospital. The new arm is a vast improvement over the previous arm, but Janet is finding it hard to master. She needs to be capable of fine, disciplined movements if she is to return to being a surgeon. 

America has a new President, Donovan, a Democratic Progressive. Like her new arm, the new President isn’t all Janet could wish him to be, but he is better than the alternative (reactionary Jeb Foley). Years into its second civil war, even a second-rate President and the hope of a disappointing peace is an improvement, at least from the perspective of the sane people of America. 

Richard Speiker’s Brotherhood of Redemption is threatened by the prospect of peace. Inauguration day is marred by a terrorist bomb attack that fails to kill its intended target thanks to what appears to be simple incompetence. 


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Like I Just Lost The World War

This is How You Lose The Time War

By Max Gladstone

11 Jul, 2019

Miscellaneous Reviews

3 comments

Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone’s 2019 This is How You Lose the Time War is a standalone SF novel. 

Two great powers, technological Agency and biological Garden, are engaged in a long, brutal war for control of reality itself. Not satisfied with shaping a single universe to suit their tastes, both sides covet control of every history of every universe. 

Red fights for Agency. Red is very good at their job. Good enough to attract the attention of Garden operative Blue. 


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