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Reviews by Contributor: Baen, Jim (3)

Saturday Night Dark Masquerade

The Taking of Satcon Station  (Asher Bockhorn, book 1)

By Jim Baen & Barney Cohen 

31 Oct, 2019

Big Hair, Big Guns!

5 comments

Barney Cohen and Jim Baen’s The Taking of Satcon Station is an SF mystery. It is also the sole Jim Baen novel of which I am aware. This is not entirely a bad thing. 

Despite the best efforts of UN red tape to impede space enterprise, a century of development has seen the building of space facilities spanning Earth orbit to the Asteroid Belt. Once the US Space Command enforced the rules. Now that is the domain of Fleet Agents like Bockhorn, working for space concerns like MexAmerican & Pacific. 

As the book opens, Bockhorn is stubbing out his cigarette before disembarking at Satcon Station. In its day, Satcon was a hotbed of cutting-edge research. Most people would say those days are long behind the eighty-eight-year-old station. Most people would be wrong: there’s a very bold project underway on Satcon. Bockhorn is going to find himself up to his … let’s say eyebrows… in it.

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Songs That May No Longer Please Us

Destinies, November – December 1978

By Jim Baen 

24 Feb, 2019

Because My Tears Are Delicious To You

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Destinies, November – December 1978 was the debut issue of Jim Baen’s bookazine Destinies. Destinies ran from late 1978 to summer of 1981. There were eleven issues, each the size of a mass market paperback; there was a Best-of anthology as well1. Back in the day, I was an avid magazine reader and this was one of my favourite magazines. 

Odd that until I reread this volume I did not remember it at all. 


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A Thousand Yesterdays

Galaxy Magazine, April 1977

Edited by Jim Baen 

27 May, 2018

Because My Tears Are Delicious To You

8 comments

When I first encountered Galaxy Magazine (I had picked up the April 1977 issue on a whim1) it was only three years away from its final issue2. Of course I had no idea that it was doomed, nor that the issue I selected was the product of something of a renaissance for the magazine, thanks to editor Jim Baen. That first encounter was satisfying enough that I bought newsstand copies until the demise of the magazine made that impossible.

How does the issue stand up two generations later?

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