Reviews: Carter, Raphael

We’ll live together, like two neighbour vines, Circling our souls and loves in one another

The Fortunate Fall — Raphael Carter

1996’s The Fortunate Fall was Raphael Carter’s debut novel—and to date, their only one1. While we can regret not having more Carter novels, we can also be grateful that we have at least this one … which is a fine book.

The genocidal Guardians fell to the Unanimous Army, a vast horde of mind-controlled slaves dancing on the strings of neurological implants. Once the Army’s task was completed, the surviving soldiers were freed to survive as best they could, often thousands of miles from home. Chaos followed.

Two law enforcement bodies, the Weavers and the Postcops, are determined to take whatever steps are necessary to prevent anyone from duplicating the crimes against humanity devised by the creator of the Unanimous Army (crimes that include the dark art of mind sculpting). Woe to anyone who falls afoul of either police force.

All this is history. For Maya Andreyeva, it is half-remembered history at best. She is an Eye (what passes for a journalist in the novel’s imagined future). Her nervous system is connected to the net, so that millions of people can experience what she experiences, see what she sees. Of course, her output is carefully edited; her superiors have no desire to see their carefully orchestrated regime endangered by rogue info.

That’s OK by Maya. It is quite unwittingly that she gives the world an experience it will never forget.


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