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Reviews in Project: The End of History (13)

Deep Blue Sea

Reefsong

By Carol Severance  

28 Dec, 2023

The End of History

4 comments

Carol Severance’s 1991 Reefsong is a stand-alone science fiction novel. 

Although her family has long since been driven off the mountain land they love by the nigh all-powerful World Life Corporation, UN Warden Angie Dinsman still labors to keep one of the last remaining wildernesses on Earth intact. She has no intention of ever leaving.

Wildfire and the World Life Corporation costs Angie her precious post.

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A Little Bit Funny

A Spell of Empire: The Horns of Tartarus

By Michael Scott Rohan & Allan J. Scott  

23 Nov, 2023

The End of History

4 comments

Michael Scott Rohan and Allan J. Scott’s 1992 A Spell of Empire: The Horns of Tartarus is an alternate-history fantasy novel.

Apprentice alchemist and hobbyist musician Volker barely survives his master’s exploration of forbidden forces. Now without a master or home, the half-elf discovers that his magical talents and his musical skills aren’t good enough, or impressive enough, to secure employment … until Volker meets tone-deaf Ulrich Tragelicht of Worms, dealer in wines and spices. Volker is just the employee that Ulrich needs.

But first, some history.

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Sweet Liberty

The Weigher

By Eric Vinicoff & Marcia Martin  

19 Oct, 2023

The End of History

5 comments

Marcia Martin and Eric Vinicoff’s 1992 The Weigher is a stand-alone first-contact xenoanthropology science fiction novel.

Slasher’s people are touchy apex predators, inclined to see each other as threats and competitors. Nevertheless, the Kodiak-bear-sized beings have a civilization of sorts, facilitated in large part by the tireless efforts of Weighers like Slasher, who work to find equitable, non-violent solutions to conflicts.

Slasher’s successful career is doomed as soon as the demons appear.

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The Sacrificial Altar to Success

Polar City Blues  (Polar City, volume 1)

By Katharine Kerr  

31 Aug, 2023

The End of History

7 comments

1991’s Polar City Blues is the first volume in Katharine Kerr’s Polar City space opera series.

During the interval between humanity’s collective triumph over Einstein (spaceflight) and the collapse of the terrestrial biosphere, humans were able to establish extraterrestrial colonies, of which Hagar is one. Now unified as the Republic, the human polity is overshadowed by its two neighbors, the Alliance (dominated by the Master Race) and the Confederation (dominated by the carlis). Remaining neutral and unconquered by aliens demands an ongoing balancing act.

Murdered consular personnel could unbalance the diplomatic teeter-totter. Polar City Police Chief Bates now must deal with a murder with far-ranging political implications.

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Castles Made of Sand

The Year’s Best Science Fiction, Twelfth Annual Collection  (The Year’s Best Science Fiction, volume 12)

 Edited by Gardner Dozois 

23 May, 2023

The End of History

2 comments


Gardner Dozois’ 1995 The Year’s Best Science Fiction, Twelfth Annual Collection is, as one might expect, the twelfth annual anthology of notable science fiction edited by Gardner Dozois. The contents of the anthology were first published in 1994. In addition to the essays listed in the table of contents, each story is accompanied by a short biographical note about the author.

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That Golden Valley

Vanishing Point

By Michaela Roessner  

18 May, 2023

The End of History

2 comments

Michaela Roessner’s 1993 Vanishing Point is a near-future science fiction novel1.

Thirty years ago, 90% of the human race vanished. Alarm and chaos ensued, followed by a gradual return to stability. While the old world will never return, civilization, particularly that part of it in and around San Jose’s Winchester House, has prevailed.

Two unrelated crises are bearing down on San Jose.

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Don’t Turn Your Back

Hellflower  (Hellflower, volume 1)

By Rosemary Edghill  

20 Apr, 2023

The End of History

2 comments

1991’s Hellflower is the first volume in the Hellflower space opera series. Hellflower was written by Rosemary Edghill under the name eluki bes shahar1.

The Phoenix Empire rose from the ruins of the Federation to provide its subjects with peace, order, and good government. Each subject has their duly allotted role. Butterfly St. Cyr has an unallotted but crucial role: low-level smuggler, testing to see how long it takes the Empire to notice her and execute her for multiple capital crimes.

Butterfly being Butterfly, she will spend the book adding to the affronts for which the Empire might want her dead.

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